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Another “Smith” Anniversary?

Amidst the many events this year celebrating William Smith and the publication of his map, comes another less well-known anniversary. The acceptance of continental drift led to a seismic shift in 20th century geology, the development of the theory of plate tectonics. This was the result of many technological and conceptual advances, one of which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year: the first mathematical joining of the trans-Atlantic continents by Sir Edward Bullard, Jim Everett, and Alan Smith.

William Smith: Colours Beneath Your Feet

William Smith: Colours Beneath Your Feet is an exhibition exploring the life of William Smith and the making of his 1815 geological map, including the first public display of a very rare, canvas-mounted travelling copy of the map (series b, 22). See the exhibition at Dudley Museum and Art Gallery, from 23rd May to 19th September 2015.

MAP – poems after William Smith’s geological map of 1815

This is a remarkable anthology of poetry; I cannot think of another geological map or geologist that is so honoured. It is a wonderfully diverse creative response to William Smith’s map, his unique insight and his dramatic life story, evoked in 42 poems from 31 invited poets. – review by John Henry

Earth’s Climate Evolution by Colin Summerhayes

Earth’s Climate Evolution analyzes reports and records of past climate change dating back to the late 18th century to uncover key patterns in the climate system. The book will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about future climate change.
20% discount available before May 2015.

A history of paleontology in China

Fossils were discovered early in human history, and their meaning has been interpreted in various ways by Chinese naturalists for over 2000 years. More recently paleontology in China has blossomed into a strong research enterprise, thanks to an enriched intellectual atmosphere, the energy of a promising economy, and the groundwork laid by generations of scientists.