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Earth’s Climate Evolution by Colin Summerhayes

Earth's Climate Evolution - Colin Summerhayes

Earth’s Climate Evolution analyzes reports and records of past climate change dating back to the late 18th century to uncover key patterns in the climate system. The book will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about future climate change.
20% discount available before May 2015.

Earth’s Climate Evolution by Colin Summerhayes

Earth's Climate Evolution - Colin Summerhayes

Earth’s Climate Evolution analyzes reports and records of past climate change dating back to the late 18th century to uncover key patterns in the climate system. The book will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about future climate change.
20% discount available before May 2015.

A history of paleontology in China

Fossils were discovered early in human history, and their meaning has been interpreted in various ways by Chinese naturalists for over 2000 years. More recently paleontology in China has blossomed into a strong research enterprise, thanks to an enriched intellectual atmosphere, the energy of a promising economy, and the groundwork laid by generations of scientists.

Britain’s top ten geological sites

James Hutton’s Siccar Point and the spectacular basalt columns of Staffa have been chosen by the public as some of their favourite geosites. The top 10 geosites are part of Earth Science Week celebrations, which start today.

Past Meeting: Murchison, the Discovery of the Silurian and the Brecon Anticlinal Field Trip

Sir Roderick Impey Murchison was one of the most important figures in 19th century geology and exploration. He was Director-General of the Geological Survey, President of the Royal Geographical Society and publicly known as the ‘King of Siluria’. In July 1831, on his first field season as a solo geologist, Murchison explored the Wye Valley. Retrospectively, over his diary entry for one of the locations we shall visit, he wrote “This was the first true Silurian”.

Can you help the Archibald Geikie project?

Sir Archibald Geikie (1835-1924) was an eminent Victorian geologist, having been President of both the Geological Society of London, and the Royal Society, the only geologist ever to have held both positions. He retired in 1901 and moved to Haslemere in 1913 where he became chairman of the Haslemere Museum in 1914, after the death […]

Lost Smith map rediscovered

A missing William Smith map of 1815 was discovered at the Geological Society on 19th February, 2014. Archivist, Caroline Lam, has been steadily working through a backlog of uncatalogued material since joining the staff two years ago. Her temporary assistant Victoria was clearing an old drawer of Centenary (1907) items and discovered a set of […]

Geological Society Founders’ Day Lecture

This year Dr Cherry Lewis, HoGG committee member, will give the Geological Society’s Founders’ Day Lecture. Hogg members can attend the lecture free of charge. Her talk entitled James Parkinson and the Founding of the Geological Society will be held at The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly on Wednesday 13 November, 2013. 17.30         Tea & coffee 18.00         Lecture […]

Two exhibitions of interest

Two exhibitions of particular interest to historians of geology are on at the moment.   Fossils: the evolution of an idea can be seen at the Royal Society in London until Friday 8 November, 2013. It combines an exhibition of books and archives from the Royal Society Library with fossils from the Sedgwick Museum of […]

Marie Tharp, the woman who discovered the Earth’s backbone

Marie Tharp was born July 30, 1920 in Ypsilanti, Michigan. As a young girl she followed her father, a soil surveyor for the United States Department of Agriculture, into the field.  However, she also loved to read and actually wanted to study literature at St. John’s College in Annapolis, but as women were not admitted […]

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